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20121204
20121204
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6
at this is basically something that you can ride along and freeload and let america and canada and japan handled? >> steve, your question -- >> i'm and freeload, by the way. >> that by the way is how the chinese would describe any relationship between japan and america. the interesting aspect of all these conflicts is that as india and china and india and china have a proximate geographically, but we've never been neighbors. >> right. >> in order to be neighbors you either have to love each other or hate each other. we have done neither. in fact, in 1962 during the first strategic conflict, between these two, you have to understand, it's hard to understand why we are not neighbors. [inaudible] in terms of inaccessible. but the positions, the lines, the strategies, the lines, what would they resonate to? the positions that are taken by postcolonial nations is that we will not be bound by decisions made by colonial powers. one, or in china's case, that we had to abandon our national positions. and now that we are strong, we need to resurrect them. right or wrong is not, that is very little to do w
in america, but unfortunately the accessibility measures that we enjoy here simply aren't present in many other countries. that's why bob dole and captain dan pe berzynski want us to appe this treaty. i've heard nothing from the other side that outweighs the reality of that consideration for persons, not just veterans, all persons with disabilities. what's really at stake here is big. the outcome here will not, despite the fear, it's not going to change one election here in the senate. it's not going to decide one of the primaries that i fear are distorting the politics of our country. but you know what, mr. president? it will decide whether some people live or die in another country, where there is no accountability and only united states values and standards are the difference to the prospects of someone with a disability. in some countries, children are disposed of, killed because they have a disability. our treaty can actually help prevent that. in some countries, children do not get to go to school and certainly have no prospects of a future simply because they are born with a disabi
for the express purpose of operations in latin america. so as a culture, we've got to be careful that we don't jettison those hard-won lessons and capabilities we have in our professional force now as i would argue we did to an extent rebuilding ourselves in the 1970s and '90s. as an institution. and that is my opinion. i think we're at that inflection point now where you've heard the president says it, you've heard the secretary say it. rebalancing toward the asia pacific region has a bunch of logical lines and thought process to that. it serves kind of that focus, i think, quite frankly, on the army. i think in the road ahead you've got to keep the foundation of what we do as brigades, infantry forces intact. do those lessons learned that i think the emphasis on mission command is probably the most important thing we've won out of iraq and afghanistan as an army. and that is the ability of trust to be decentralized in it planning, preparation and execution to very low levels. when i came in, first unit with the 82nd airborne at fort bragging, there was only a -- fort bragg, there was only
. president, if -- there are a lot of things that make america a shining city on a hill but there's one thing that no one can dispute that does put america as a shining city on a hill, and that is the americans with disabilities act, and what it has done to our society. like our civil rights act. what it's done to break down the barriers and to show that people with disabilities can contribute to society, if only given the chance and the opportunity. i would think that we would want for them to then say yes, we'll be a part of a worldwide effort to break down those barriers against people with disabilities we want be part of a worldwide effort that says it's not right, it's not okay, to leave a baby on the side of the road to die simply because that baby has down syndrome. you would think we would want to be part of an effort, a global effort that says it's not all right to keep kids out of school and away from education because they have a physical disability, they use a wheelchair. or an intellectual disability. you would think we would want to be part of an effort like that that says it is
gives the meeting to the united states of america. thank you. >> thank you so much. all of our speakers have been extraordinary, and i no -- i am going to, with your permission, include a lot of these photographs in our records. okay. okay. and our last senator to speak before we head to our house colleagues will be senator blumenthal from connecticut. we are so delighted that you could be here. go right ahead. >> thank you very much. i want to thank you and ranking member and half for today's hearing. my colleagues to have stated so eloquently what happened in new york and new jersey, connecticut , share their faith although the lack -- national media coverage may give the impression that connecticut's damage was more a footnote to the main story. in fact, the destruction and damage in connecticut was every bit as real, and the pockets of destruction as pervasive as elsewhere, and i think many of the lessons learned the you heard here form a pattern that we need to invest now or pay later. there are measures that we can take now to minimize the damage in the future, and we cannot be pe
done? [inaudible] >> yet, soccer. so they say that cheney spoke a foot stadium. what has america done for us? i will admit in a pillowcase comment i was frustrated by that and say americans invent and how thick dignities and education and the fact that there are young people alive to watch football is largely because of the people of the united states. that's kind of her difference. we've chosen a path of investment, human capital. it pays off in the long term rather than the immediacy of a football stadium. we've seen over the past several years 30 plus% decline in hiv/aids. that's not exclusively in the united states feared where the largest contributor to the end is something we should be proud of. it's huge that people in africa have that. >> last weekon monday or senator kirsten gillibrand delivered testimony on the hill and told stories of families who lost children to hurricane cindy. those hit hardest by the film testified by the senate environment and public works committee. new york, new jersey, rhode island, maryland and delaware lawmakers talked about the impact in the ong
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6